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Delivering a Web Design

Organizations vary in the amount and nature of the paperwork required for each phase of application development. In writing this book we have the luxury of sidestepping paperwork issues to cut to the chase. From a programmer’s perspective, you can expect a Web designer to deliver the following design products:

  • HTML pages (HTM or HTML files)
  • CSS style sheet (CSS file)
  • images (GIF and JPG files)
  • JavaScript (JS file)

The VB Snippets case study makes use of all of these design products. Figure 15-3 shows a collage of seven of the thirty HTML pages delivered by the designer for VB Snippets. Let us quickly mention that several of the design pages show different states of particular pages, so not all thirty represent different Web pages to be developed. For example, the index_logged_in.htm page contains the design of the index.htm page after a visitor has logged in to the Web application.

Note: When you download the Chapter_15 project, you receive all of the design files as well. You can find the original HTM, CSS, and JS files in the Chapter_15\design folder. The Chapter_15\images folder contains the images received from the designer.

Figure 15-3. The Web design HTML specifies the appearance and interaction among the pages of the Web site.
Chapter 15, Figure 03.

The disadvantage of receiving HTML files in this form is, of course, that you need to do some cutting and pasting after creating the corresponding ASPX files in Visual Studio .NET. Because you will be creating reusable controls for many portions of a Web design, however, the amount of this cutting and pasting is limited enough not to be tedious. In the meantime, the delivered design remains a constant reference. When anomalies appear during development (and some will), you can compare the source HTML sent to the browser by your code to the HTML delivered by the Web designer to determine the differences.

For Web applications other than the very smallest, you will also encounter situations that will require design updates. A frequent cause for this is that some actual string data turns out to be longer than the designer expected. In that case, you should show the designer how this affects the appearance of the Web page, and allow the Web designer to make any required changes to the HTML originally submitted. If you’ve established a good working relationship, the Web designer will also help you locate, in difficult cases, the specific HTML problems that cause the appearance of a Web page in a browser to differ from the design.

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